Wednesday, May 23, 2007

Truth And Consequences

That should teach Jason Giambi. Tell the truth and they will take you down.

Their new weapon of choice is the “confidential drug test.”

Barry Bonds was the target this winter. A “confidential drug test” for amphetamines was leaked to the media during his contract negotiations with the Giants. They wanted to push him out of the game and they almost succeeded.

Now, Giambi’s “confidential drug test” for amphetamines is leaked to the media just days after he told USA Today:

“I was wrong for doing that stuff. What we should have done a long time ago was stand up – players, ownership, everybody – and said: ‘We made a mistake.’

“We should have apologized back then and made sure we had a rule in place and gone forward… Steroids and all of that was a part of history. But it was a topic that everybody wanted to avoid. Nobody wanted to talk about it.”

Giambi dared to speak out and challenge the game to do the right thing. Now he will pay. The bill came on the cover of the Daily News: “Flunked! News learns Giambi failed test for amphetamines.”

A strategic shot.

The game is controlled by people with a lot more money and power than Giambi or Bonds or any player or all the players. The message is certainly clear: Step out of line or speak out of turn and there will be consequences.

They can get to anyone at anytime. And none of it has anything to do with the integrity of the game or the health of the players. It is all about money and power.

Those who own the game will do anything to protect their investment. They will decide how it is investigated and how it is displayed. They will redefine the word “confidential” and leak information in gross violation of the collective bargaining agreement. They will steal people’s privacy and smear them at will. They are above the law and above us all.

Giambi, Bonds, Integrity, You and Me are all expendable for the good of the bottom line.

7 comments:

Michael said...

I just read about Giambi over at Highbrid Nation and the writer over there really put things in perspective for me. The media has really blew the whole "performance enhancing drug" thing out of proportion. Seriously, I'm not saying its ok to use these drugs but can we please stop acting like these drugs give athletes some kind of super human advantage over thier peers.

Ben said...

Todd, I think I agree with everything you've written. But how do you think MLB should address the steroids issue going foreward? There's no question that drugs give players an advantage; just look at statistics. And there's no question that players will use them if there's no testing. So what's the solution?

Todd Drew said...

Ben,
I think Major League Baseball should address the issue with testing, just as they have been. It’s all covered in the collective bargaining agreement. Only the players are honoring that agreement. The commissioner and owners make up rules and ignore laws as they go.

J A F F E said...

It sure was interesting that the amphetamine story is "leaked" just after Jason stands up. I find that most most interesting and of course the everyday b.s. media is painting the man into a corner. I don't hold with anyone taking drugs. We live in a nation run by big Pharma. But the man is coming forth like no one else has. Maybe we are not getting the whole truth but at least he stepped up and for that he deserves better, much better.

Todd Drew said...

Jaffe,
Agreed. The most disturbing fact is that this was clearly leaked to hurt a person. It was the same with Bonds. It’s a hammer that the game seems to holding over every player. “Step out of line and we have the power to take you out.”

J A F F E said...

i used to worship sport when i was growing up. i felt that the game was what counted and how you played more than winning or losing was truly what sport was about. of course i wanted to win but that was not why i played or watched. the intense media and making of sports into entertainment has so changed the game to me. i was not caring whether or not mickey drank at night.. i wanted to watch him play. it was not even in my mindset. Jeeter plays like that. he has that attitude (and yes i know he makes big money but he does not seem to let that get in the way of how he plays the game). I don't think i watched with innocence it was more not even part of my think. i just loved the game for the game no more no less. i did not consider the players gods.. but the game was king. between the lines you knew what was fair or foul, unlike life where there are no lines. now the lines have been brushed away by too much media, greed, the circus. i dont know.. i just know i dont like it.

carey said...

i have to wonder whether what's happening with the "war on drugs" in the MLB isn't a reflection in miniature of what's happening in the larger "war on drugs." not to defend any of their actions, but the players have always -- and will always -- do what it takes to gain an advantage. and while legalizing the use of any performance-enhancing drug is not necessarily an option, i think it's difficult to know where to draw the line. and i agree with todd on this: selective disclosure to bring down players is as unjust as using. it's an abuse of power.